The many facets of leadership

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Like any other manager of a functional group, the product development manager wears many hats.  He or she is a technical lead, a head coach, a Gantt meister, an HR specialist, a product architect, a social chair, a strategist, a tactical guerilla fighter, a human shield against distractions, a cheer leader, a measurer and communicator of team performance (whether good or bad), a translator of corporate strategy to his/her team, and a translator of technical jabberwocky to less technical stakeholders.

He/she must take care of his/her product as well as people.  He/she must work effectively with product management, sales, marketing, manufacturing (for hardware products), finance and operations to ensure the output of the development team plugs into a viable and implementable company plan.

How do you measure the performance of the development manager?  Which aspects are the most important to watch?

There is no right answer to this question because the hat prioritization depends on the organization, the state of the product development process, the personal dynamics inside and outside the development team, and the personality and style of the development manager.

For me, under most circumstances, the success of my team defines my own success.  There are two areas to watch:

  • Team performance: Is the team hitting its milestones on execution and developing a great product effectively and efficiently?
  • Team development: Are we nurturing and empowering team members to grow and prosper in their respective careers?

Team Performance
The greatest compliment anyone can give me and my team is to tell us that we are an execution machine. A team that performs well and executes its initiatives is a team that shines.  

Now how do you create conditions to help your team excel? First and foremost, the right people must be in the right jobs.  There’s no way to get excellent performance out of an organization if people don’t have the right aptitude and training to do the job they are asked to do in the time frame that the job needs to be done.   Performance will also suffer if people are made to do things they don’t like to do for extended periods of time.  

Second, we must clearly define goals and objectives, and then stick to them for long enough so the team has a chance to execute against those goals. To be in a startup is to be in flux. New data and learnings flow in all the time and we do need to be able to stay nimble and pivot rapidly when the data tells us to do so. That said, continuous thrashing is the best way to trash a team’s performance and morale. We must strike a balance between our desire to turn on a dime and our need to stay focused so we can execute against the best available information, creating deliverables that will help us test and learn for the next iteration.

Lastly, we need to succinctly define success in a clear and tangible way, then measure the team’s performance against these success metrics.  What you can measure you can improve.  There is nothing more motivating than being able to celebrate victories when we hit our milestones.  And when we miss, those are learning moments that give us valuable data to help improve our performance the next go-around.

Team Development
The second thing to watch for is whether team members feel happy and supported in their jobs, and whether they are growing and prospering along their chosen career paths.

I take the coaching aspect of a development manager’s responsibility very seriously. To the extent possible, the development organization should provide opportunities for team members to learn new things and stretch their skills in their areas of interest.  

While I believe the primary characteristic of a high caliber development team is its performance, a happy, motivated team in a trusted, supportive work environment that looks out for their interests and takes steps to help them grow can usually get more work done faster and with a better quality of output.

What do you think about all this?  How would you prioritize these hats in your own role?

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